Once More Out of the Breach: Gary Westfahl Reviews Pacific Rim: Uprising

If you are delayed by inclement weather while traveling to see Pacific Rim: Uprising, do not be overly dismayed, because the film might actually be more enjoyable if you walk into the theater an hour after it has started. True, you will struggle to understand some aspects of the plot, but when you are watching enormous, human-controlled robots (jaegers) battling against loathsome reptilian monsters (kaiju) in brilliantly choreographed sequences ...Read More

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In the Oceans of Madness – Intelligence: A Review of Pacific Rim

by Gary Westfahl

Perhaps I am suffering from a form of dementia induced by excessive exposure to cinematic explosions and high-tech battles, but I thoroughly enjoyed watching Pacific Rim, despite the very low expectations that I brought to the theatre, and I would heartily recommend Guillermo del Toro’s production to anyone long enamored of science fiction films. This is because, in contrast to most of the noisy blockbusters that ...Read More

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Hail Hydra! Josh Pearce and Arley Sorg Discuss Godzilla: King of the Monsters

Godzilla: King of the Monsters has a lot of things in it that will please Godzilla fans, and plenty that will piss them off. It is a sequel to 2014’s Godzilla, which was directed by Gareth Edwards, and picks up shortly after that movie’s destruction of San Francisco and Godzilla’s subsequent disappearance. Mark Russell (Kyle Chandler), who lost his son in the attack, wants Godzilla and all other “Titans” ...Read More

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The Creature Waltzes Among Us: A Review of The Shape of Water, by Gary Westfahl

As has happened before, I face the dilemma of reviewing a film that I have been clearly instructed to like, yet did not actually like. But, one might ask, what is there is dislike about The Shape of Water? It is the work of an author-director, Guillermo del Toro, who has repeatedly demonstrated his knowledge of, and fondness for, science fiction films, as well demonstrated by the excellent Pacific ...Read More

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Our Dinosaurs, Ourselves: A Review of Jurassic World

by Gary Westfahl

If you are wondering whether or not you should see Jurassic World, here is this reviewer’s advice: either pay the exorbitant price of admission to watch the film in a theatre, or never bother to watch it at all. Viewed on a small screen, the way I watched the other Jurassic Park films, this fourth installment’s shrunken dinosaurs will not be impressive, and the flaws that ...Read More

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2014 Hugo and Campbell Awards Winners

Winners for the Hugo Awards and for the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer were announced at Loncon 3, the 72nd World Science Fiction Convention, held in London, England, August 17, 2014.

Best Novel (1,595 nominating ballots)

Ancillary Justice, Ann Leckie (Orbit US; Orbit UK) Warbound, Larry Correia (Baen) Parasite, Mira Grant (Orbit US; Orbit UK) The Wheel of Time (complete series), Robert Jordan & ...Read More Read more

The 2014 Scribe Awards Winners

The International Association of Media Tie-In Writers announced the winners of the 8th Annual Scribe Awards, for the best in tie-in fiction of 2013, at Comic-Con International in San Diego, July 24-27, 2014.

General Novel Original

Mr. Monk Helps Himself, Hy Conrad (Penguin) The Executioner: Sleeping Dragons, Michael A. Black (Gold Eagle) Murder She Wrote: Close-Up on Murder, Donald Bain (Penguin) Leverage: The Bestseller Job, Greg ...Read More Read more

2013 Nebula Awards Winners

The 2013 Nebula Awards were presented May 17, 2014 in a ceremony at  SFWA’s 49th Annual Nebula Awards Weekend, held in San Jose CA. Samuel R. Delany was honored with the 2013 Damon Knight Grand Master Award for his lifetime contributions and achievements in the field.

Novel

Ancillary Justice, Ann Leckie (Orbit US; Orbit UK) We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, Karen Joy Fowler (Marian Wood) The Ocean ...Read More Read more

Dinosaur Train Wreck: A Review of Godzilla

by Gary Westfahl

So, if you’re longing for the experience of watching an enormous dinosaur trample his way through a contemporary city this weekend, access your Netflix account, or find one of the few remaining DVD rental stores, and check out a Godzilla movie. Any Godzilla movie. The original 1954 film is, of course, a must-see, preferably the version without Raymond Burr (though his edited-in performance has its moments); films ...Read More

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2014 Hugo and Campbell Awards Finalists

Nominees for the Hugo Awards and for the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer have been announced by LonCon 3, the 72nd World Science Fiction Convention, to be held in London, England, August 14- 18, 2014.

Best Novel (1,595 nominating ballots)

Warbound, Larry Correia (Baen) Parasite, Mira Grant (Orbit US; Orbit UK) The Wheel of Time (complete series), Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson (Tor) Ancillary Justice ...Read More Read more

2014 Scribe Award Nominees

The International Association of Media Tie-in Writers announced the nominees for the 2014 Scribe Awards, honoring excellence in licensed tie-in writing:

General Novel Original

The Executioner: Sleeping Dragons, Michael A. Black (Gold Eagle) Murder She Wrote: Close-Up on Murder, Donald Bain (Penguin) Leverage: The Bestseller Job, Greg Cox (Berkley) Leverage: The Zoo Job, Keith R. A. DeCandido (Berkley) Mr. Monk Helps Himself, Hy Conrad (Penguin) ...Read More Read more

2013 Nebula Awards Nominees Announced

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America has announced the nominees for the 2013 Nebula Awards (presented 2014), the nominees for the Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation, and the nominees for the Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy.

Novel

We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, Karen Joy Fowler (Marian Wood) The Ocean at the End of the Lane, Neil Gaiman (Morrow; ...Read More Read more

“It’s Time to Go Home”: A Review of Gravity

by Gary Westfahl

Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity is not only an excellent movie that people should see, but also an excellent movie that people need to see, to learn about what they have mostly been missing in the last half century of films about space travel – namely, the actual experience of living in space. True, there have been other “spacesuit films” that I have examined at length, but it is ...Read More

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Weekly Bestsellers, 12 August

Ilona Andrews’ Magic Rises (Ace), sixth book in her Kate Daniels series, debuts at #1 on the New York Times mass market paperback list.

 

Title Debut / #wks on any list NYT 08.18 WP 07.28 LAT 08.11 USAT 08.04 PW 08.12 Amz (08.12) UK: Amz UK (08.12) Canada: Amz.ca (08.12) Items on list -x- number of lists surveyed 30×4 10×2 15×2 150 15×3 100 100 100 Hardcovers Atkinson, Life ...Read More Read more

Heaven Off Earth: A Review of Elysium

by Gary Westfahl Anyone reviewing Elysium must begin, I suppose, by addressing the controversy du jour surrounding its release, namely, the extent to which the film is a disguised portrayal of contemporary America and its political issues. Certainly, despite their protestations, such suspicions of a covert agenda cannot be surprising to writer-director Neil Blomkamp and his cast; after all, when you describe the agency protecting the space station of the ...Read More Read more

Weekly Bestsellers, 5 August

Lauren Beukes’ The Shining Girls (Mulholland) rank #13 this week on the Los Angeles Times list — its first appearance on any of these lists.

 

Title Debut / #wks on any list NYT 08.11 WP 07.28 LAT 08.04 USAT 07.28 PW 08.05 Amz (08.05) UK: Amz UK (08.05) Canada: Amz.ca (08.05) Items on list -x- number of lists surveyed 30×4 10×2 15×2 150 15×3 100 100 100 Hardcovers Aaronovitch, ...Read More Read more

Lois Tilton reviews Short Fiction, mid-December

Getting into the new year’s first issues of F&SF and Subterranean. Also some of the December ezines and the fall issue of On Spec.

 

Publications Reviewed F&SF, Jan/Feb 2013 Subterranean, Winter 2013 Eclipse Online, December 2012 Lightspeed, December 2012 Nightmare Magazine, December 2012 Strange Horizons, December 2012 On Spec, Fall 2012

 

F&SF, Jan/Feb 2013

A middling-good issue with some good stories.

“Watching the Cow” by Alex Irvine

The ...Read More

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Cory Doctorow: No Endorsement

My 2009 novel Makers concerned itself, partly, with the upheaval that might attend cheap, ubiquitous 3D ‘‘printing.’’ I put ‘‘printing’’ in scare quotes because calling a device that produces arbitrary, articulated three dimensional objects (including functional, assembled multipart mechanisms and solid-state devices) on demand a ‘‘printer’’ is like calling a car a ‘‘horseless carriage’’ or Skype an ‘‘Internet telephone.’’

One aspect I didn’t delve into with much depth is the ...Read More

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Colleen Mondor Reviews The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi

The Gilded Wolves, Roshani Chokshi (Wednes­day Books 978-1-250-14454-6, $18.99, 388pp, tp) January 2019.

In this glittering journey through a fantastical late 19th-century Paris, author Roshani Chokshi gifts readers with adventure wrapped in mystery wrapped in (unorthodox) family drama that in­corporates aspects of crime thrillers, caper flicks, and a fair bit of James Bond-esque espionage. The descriptions of the 1889 Paris Exposition are exquisite, and the history that Chokshi weaves ...Read More

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Colleen Mondor Reviews The Tesla Legacy by K.K. Pérez

The Tesla Legacy, K.K. Pérez (Tor Teen 978-1-250-08489-7, $17.99, 368pp, tp) March 2019.

K.K. Pérez’s The Tesla Legacy presents a familiar but always compelling premise: what if you are not the person you think you are? In this case, high school senior Lucy thinks she knows herself very well. She’s a former homeschooler now happily ensconced in public school, living just outside New York City, where she pursues an ...Read More

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Brenda Cooper and Joey Eschrich Guest Post–“From Guilt To Hope: Why We Write Climate Fiction”

In the shadow of several years of climate chaos, from devastating hurricanes and unforeseen droughts to migrant crises, climate fiction is experiencing a surge of popularity in speculative and other literature. There is an emerging global consciousness that climate change is present and urgent, and that it affects all of us even if its impacts vary wildly depending on who and where you are.

Climate fiction often depicts people who ...Read More

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Colleen Mondor Reviews In an Absent Dream by Seanan McGuire

In an Absent Dream, Seanan McGuire (Tor.com Publishing 978-0-7653-9929-8, $17.99, 192pp, tp) January 2019.

In Seanan McGuire’s elegantly written In an Absent Dream, readers are taken on a years-long coming-of-age story through the Goblin Market that proves to be just as insightful about our own world as the fantastic one she creates. This new entry in the Wayward Children series (which can be enjoyed as a standalone) follows ...Read More

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Colleen Mondor Reviews Inkmistress by Audrey Coulthurst

Inkmistress, Audrey Coulthurst (Balzer & Bray 978-0-06-243328-2, $17.99, 387pp, hc) March 2018.

In its opening paragraphs, Audrey Coulthurst’s Inkmistress seems to be a story about love. The protagonist, Asra, declares her love and longing for Ina, the beautiful girl who lives in the village below, and soon, with the coming of spring, will return to her. They are aware that their relationship must remain secret – the fear engendered ...Read More

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Colleen Mondor Reviews The Agony House Cherie Priest

The Agony House, Cherie Priest (Scholastic/Levine 978-0-545-93435-0 $18.99 272pp, hc) September 2018. Cover by Tara O’Connor.

Cherie Priest takes a pause from adult fiction with this second foray into YA after the cyberthriller I Am Princess X. This time she goes full creepy with a haunted house story set in New Orleans that also manages to throw in a hefty dose of the history of comic books and ...Read More

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Karen Burnham Reviews Short Fiction: Lightspeed, BCS, Tor.com, and CSZ

Lightspeed 8/18, 9/18 Beneath Ceaseless Skies 9/18 Tor.com 7/19/18, 8/1/18 Cascadia Subduction Zone, Vol 8, No. 3

Lightspeed has reached its 100th issue! A proud milestone for any magazine, they celebrate in style this September with a more-than-double issue: ten stories plus extra reprints and interviews. It leads with a mythic SF story, “Her Monster, Whom She Loved” by Vylar Kaftan. In this story a goddess births ...Read More

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Colleen Mondor Reviews The City of Sand by Tianxia Bachang

The City of Sand, Tianxia Bachang (Delacorte 978-0-553-52410-9 $17.99, 243pp, tp) November 2017.

For readers looking for a full-tilt adventure with a side order of the supernatural, Chi­nese author Tianxia Bachang has all they could want with The City of Sand. The novel starts with a bang as teenage “gold hunters” Tianyi and Kai awaken a very angry spirit while looking for treasure inside a grave. Their Indiana ...Read More

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2018 Directory

This page compiles 2018 books 1) reviewed in Locus Magazine; 2) listed in Locus Online’s New Titles & Bestsellers pages; 3) and selected forthcoming titles not yet seen.

Jump down to:

Novels | YA novels | Novellas & short fiction | Collections | Anthologies | Nonfiction & Art | Media & Gaming Related | New in Paperback | Classic Reprints

 

Novels • Aaronovitch, Ben • Lies Sleeping • (UK: ...Read More Read more

2018 British Fantasy Awards Winners

The British Fantasy Society has announced the winners for the 2018 British Fantasy Awards:

Best Fantasy Novel (the Robert Holdstock Award)

WINNER: The Ninth Rain, Jen Williams (Headline) Age of Assassins, RJ Barker (Orbit) Under the Pendulum Sun, Jeannette Ng (Angry Robot) The Court of Broken Knives, Anna Smith Spark (HarperVoyager)

Best Horror Novel (the August Derleth Award)

WINNER: The Changeling, Victor LaValle (Spiegel & ...Read More Read more

Colleen Mondor reviews A Thousand Beginnings and Endings edited by Ellen Oh & Elsie Chapman

A Thousand Beginnings and Endings, Ellen Oh & Elsie Chapman, eds. (Greenwillow 978-0-06-267115-8, $17.99, 336pp, hc) June 2018.

In the introduction to A Thousand Beginnings and Endings, editors Elsie Chapman & Ellen Oh write of their deep love for myth and leg­end, something many readers will likely identify with. However, for Chapman and Oh, immersion in tales of Greek and Norse gods, while exciting, was always a bit ...Read More

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2018 British Fantasy Awards Shortlist

The British Fantasy Society has announced the shortlist for the 2018 British Fantasy Awards. The nominees are:

Best Fantasy Novel (the Robert Holdstock Award)

Age of Assassins, RJ Barker (Orbit) Under the Pendulum Sun, Jeannette Ng (Angry Robot) The Court of Broken Knives, Anna Smith Spark (HarperVoyager) The Ninth Rain, Jen Williams (Headline)

Best Horror Novel (the August Derleth Award)

The Boy on the Bridge, ...Read More Read more

Gary K. Wolfe Reviews Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach by Kelly Robson

Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach, Kelly Robson (Tor.com 978-1-2501-6385-1, $14.99, 240pp, tp) March 2018. Cover by Jon Foster.

There is much to admire in Kelly Robson’s novella Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach – her surprising skill at rigorous SF worldbuilding after a career distinguished mostly by clever fantasies like “The Waters of Versailles”, her nuanced characterization, especially of a cranky, middle-aged woman protagonist (with six leg-like tentacle ...Read More

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Colleen Mondor Reviews The Possible by Tara Altebrando

The Possible, Tara Altebrando (Bloomsbury 978-1-61963-805-1, $17.99, 292 pages) June 2017.

For the first six pages of The Possible, Tara Altebrando wrote a YA novel about a smart-ass 17-year old named Kaylee who has two best friends, a crush on a classmate, and a killer talent on the softball mound. All of this is familiar territory and Altebrando delivers it with a degree of sass and wit that ...Read More

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