Table of Contents, April 1990

This is the scanned Table of Contents for the issue, embedded as a PDF. It is searchable and includes all of the titles reviewed in the month. These issues are not available digitally yet, but most can be ordered by contacting the Locus offices.

THE NEWSPAPER OF THE SCIENCE FICTION FIELD
(ISSN-0047-4959)
EDITOR & PUBLISHER
Charles N. Brown
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Faren C. Miller
ASSOCIATE MANAGER
Shelly Rae Clift
PRODUCTION ASSOCIATE
Pamela F. Troy
ASSISTANT EDITOR
Scott Winnett
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Edward Bryant
Richard Curtis
Carolyn F. Cushman
Mark R. Kelly
Fritz Leiber
Tom Whitmore
SPECIAL PROJECTS
William G. Contento
CON REPORTERS
Beth Gwinn
Jane Jewell
Locus, (ISSN-0047-4959), The Newspaper of the
Science Fiction Field, is published monthly by LOCUS
PUBLICATIONS Editorial address: 34 Ridgewood
Lane, Oakland, CA 94611; telephone (415) 339-9196,
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Contents copyright c 1989 by Locus Publications.
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Table of Contents
STORIES
Geoff Ryman Wins Clarke Award…………………….. 5
BSFA Awards Nominations ……………………………… 5
1989 Bestsellers…………………………………………………. 5
Robert E. Howard Museum Planned…………………. 5
Montana Spirit House Settlement…………………….. 5
Fantasy Wins Avon Flare C o n test…………………….. 7
Dan Simmons’ Missing Pag e ……………………………… 7
Waldenbooks, B. Dalton, Crown Announce
Discount Programs ………………………………………. 7
Supreme Court Rejects Holt Appeal
on Hubbard Biography…………………………………. 7
Ray Bradbury: The Grand Master E ditions……… 7
THE DATA FILE
Publishing News ……………………………………………….. 9
Court C a se s……………………………………………………….. 9
Bookstore News ……………………………………………….. 9
Announcements ……………………………………………….. 9
Awards …………………………………………………………….. 49
Market News …………………………………………………… 49
Book News……………………………………………………….. 49
Rights & Permissions………………………………………. 50
SF Online…………………………………………………………. 50
SF on R ad io ……………………………………………………… 50
SF Opera …………………………………………………………. 50
Publications Received …………………………………….. 50
INTERVIEWS
Peter Straub: Disappearing Into Fiction…………… 4
COLUMNS & DEPARTMENTS
Editorial Matters……………………………………………….. 3
People & Publishing………………………………………….. 8
Agent’s Corner, Richard Curtis ………………………. 27
Locus Bulletin B o a rd ………………………………………. 29
Locus Letters……………………………………………………. 48
LOCUS LOOKS AT BOOKS
Distillations: Short Fiction Reviews
by Mark R. Kelly:………………………………………. 11
IASFM 5/90; Semiotext(e) SF; Penthouse Hot
Talk 3-4/90; Arrows of Eros, Alex Stewart, ed.;
Omni 3/90; Omni 4/90.
Special Reviews by Scott Winnett:…………………… 13
Fantasy Literature: A Reader’s Guide, Neil Barron,
ed.; Horror Literature: A Reader’s Guide,
Neal Barron, ed.; Bloomsbury Good Reading
Guide to Science Fiction and Fantasy, M. H.
Zool.
Reviews by Faren Miller:…………………………………. 15
The Quiet Pools, Michael P. Kube-McDowell;
Agviq, Michael Armstrong; Mary Reilly, Valerie
Martin; Cambio Bay, Kate Wilhelm;
Semiotext(e) SF, Rudy Rucker, Peter Lamborn
Wilson, & Robert Anton Wilson, eds.
Reviews by Edward Bryant:………………………………17
Slice, Rex Miller; Mine, Robert R. McCammon;
The Phantom Blooper, Gustav Hasford;
Second Contact, Mike Resnick; The Cybernetic
Shogun, Victor Milan. SHORT TAKES:
Nightblood, T. Chris Martindale; The Hacker,
Chet Day; The Night Man, K. W. Jeter; Page
305 of The Fall of Hyperion, Dan Simmons.
Reviews by Carolyn Cushman: …………………………21
The Hawk’s Gray Feather, Patricia Kennealy;
Charlemagne’s Champion, Gail Van Asten;
Spell Bound, Ru Emerson; The Last Whales,
Lloyd Abbey; Among Madmen, Jim Starlin &
Dania Graziunas; The Artifact, W. Michael
Gear; The Moonbane Mage, Laurie J. Marks;
Red Wizard, Nancy Springer; Sunrunner’s
Fire, Melanie Rawn; Cyber Way, Alan Dean
Foster, This Time, Forever, Constance O’Day-
Flannery.
Reviews by Tom Whitmore:………………………………23
The Leiber Chronicles, Fritz Leiber; The Fall of
Hyperion, Dan Simmons; Skeleton-in-Waiting,
Peter Dickinson; Mighty Good Road,
Melissa Scott; Author’s Choice Monthly Issue
4: Nine Hard Questions About the Nature of the
Universe, Lewis Shiner.
Short Reviews by Scott Winnett:……………………….25
The Unseen, Joseph Citro; Necrotrivia Vs.
Skull, Jeremy Clarke; Star Sister, Juanita Coulson;
Barrow, John Deakins; The Hour of Blue,
Robert Froese; Dark Horse, Mary Herbert; Infinity
Hold, Barry B. Longyear; Sassinak, Anne
McCaffrey & Elizabeth Moon; Deadly Resurrection,
John McCarty; The Cybernetic Shogun,
Victor Milan; Silent Moon, William Relling,
Jr.; Subterranean Gallery, Richard Paul
Russo; Distant Signals and Other Stories,
Andrew Weiner.
LISTINGS
Magazines Received — Feb ru a ry ……………………… 34
Books Received —February………………………………35
British Books—January ……………………………………41
Bestsellers………………………………………………………… 47
OBITUARIES
Harold Leland Goodwin……………………………………48
Dorothy James R o b e rts ……………………………………48
Wendayne Ackerman ……………………………………….48
Leo Giroux………………………………………………………. 48
Peter Straub………………. (BG) 4
Geoff Ryman ……………(CNB) 5
Fritz Leiber………………… (BG) 8
Mike Resnick……………(CNB) 8
Keith Brooke ………………… (F) 8
Margaret Weis, Tracy
PHOTO LISTING
Hickman……………………(JJ) 8
William F. Wu, Diana
Gallagher……………..(CNB) 8
Bruce Sterling, William
Gibson ………………… (CNB) 8
Norman S p in ra d ………. (BG) 9
Harold L. Goodwin ……..(BS)48
Wendayne Ackerman (CNB)48
Leo Giroux………………….. (JJ)48
PHOTO CREDITS: (BG) Beth Gwinn, (CNB) Charles N. Brown, (F) Furnished, (JJ) Jane Jewell, (BS)
Baltimore Sun.
ISSUE #351, VOL 24 NO. 4, April 1990, Mailing Date: March 22,1990
Editorial Matters
Welcome to the 22nd anniversary issue of Locus.
There isn’t anything special about it except the cover,
and alas, the new higher price. In fact, it’s smaller than
the last couple of issues. It isn’t a trend or harbinger
of the future; we just managed to get all the existing
material into print earlier than usual.
Locus has now been in existence for parts of four
decades. Its beginnings were tied closely to the ’60s in
both intent and execution —the casual slapped-together
style and the colorful look. The ’70s covered
the sometimes painful switch from a casual fannish
weekend endeavor to a trade journal about sf, which
eventually became a full-time job. Even in ’79, when
I was doing nothing else, it was still a stop-gap measure
until I went back to engineering, o r made a success
of writing. The ’80s were the period of growth and
change. Locus was in the right place at the right time
as the sf, then fantasy, then horror fields went from
minor genre to big time midlist (and bestseller!) publishing.
I can’t give you a date when I realized I had a
new permanent vocation, but it was probably when I
found myself becoming a manager with a staff, when
I no longer was able to enter subscriptions, do most of
the packing, chase after bookstore accounts, etc.
Ironically, I actually enjoyed all that, and had given up
engineering because I was becoming a manager instead
of just doing straight technical work.
What will the ’90s bring? At the moment, I’m pretty
satisfied with the magazine, but I know that won’t last.
(It never has!). Besides, Locus is as big as it can get in
size and circulation to be run as it is (I’ve said that before,
too). It’s still, after 22 years, put together in the
living room (and lately, the kitchen) and mailed by a
gang of friends in exchange for dinner and conversation.
We’ve had a few nibbles from large companies
(and even a corporate raider!) wanting to take over
Locus until they discovered our corporate setup
Continued on page 49
LOCUS April 1990/3