Rich Horton Reviews Short Fiction: BCS, Lightspeed, Clarkesworld, Galaxy’s Edge, Kaleidotrope, and Apex

Beneath Ceaseless Skies, 2/1/18, 2/15/18, 3/1/18 Lightspeed 2/18, 3/18 Clarkesworld 1/18, 2/18 Galaxy’s Edge 1/18 Kaleidotrope Winter ’18 Apex 2/18

February is Science-Fantasy Month at Be­neath Ceaseless Skies, one of my favorite times! And as a bonus, this year it extends to the first day in March, so there are three is­sues of stories that mix SF and fantasy (often by describing SFnal situations in the language of fantasy.) My ...Read More

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Rich Horton Reviews Tender, Analog, Asimov’s, BCS, Uncanny, Slate, and New Haven Noir

Tender, Sofia Samatar (Small Beer) April 2017. Analog 1/18 Asimov’s 1-2/18 Beneath Ceaseless Skies 1/4/18 Uncanny 1-2/18 Slate 1/17/18 New Haven Noir, Amy Bloom, ed. (Akashic) June 2017.

I am continuing to catch up on some 2017 stuff I missed. For example, Sofia Samatar‘s col­lection Tender is one of the best collections I’ve seen in some time. This exceptional debut collection includes two new stories, “An Account ...Read More

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Rich Horton Reviews Uncanny, Lackington’s, Rivet, All Systems Red, and The Martian Job

Uncanny 11-12/17 Lackington’s Fall ’17 Rivet Journal Fall ’17 All Systems Red, Martha Wells (Tor.com) Sep­tember 2017. The Martian Job, Jaine Fenn (NewCon) De­cember 2017.

 

Uncanny in November-December features a very effective story by Tina Connolly, “Pipecleaner Sculptures and Other Necessary Work“, about an android on a generation starship who faces a transition as they reach their destination – from a preschool teacher to ...Read More

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SF Short Fiction, 2017 by Rich Horton

How to view the state of the field now? SF (and fantasy) are in some sort of pop culture ascendance – the rapturous reception of The Last Jedi on the one hand, and Wonder Woman on another hand, and even The Shape of Water (a more ambitious film than the more popular pair I mentioned, and yet also an hommage of sorts to 1950s monster movies) is surely evidence of ...Read More

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Rich Horton Reviews Short Fiction: F&SF, Lightspeed, Clarkesworld, and Beneath Ceaseless Skies

F&SF 1-2/18 Lightspeed 1/18 Clarkesworld 12/17 Beneath Ceaseless Skies 12/7/17, 12/21/17

The highlight of F&SF‘s first 2018 issue is Dale Bailey‘s gleefully horrifying story “The Donner Party“. It opens with young Mrs. Breen delighted to be tasting human flesh for the first time – at a party given by the influential Lady Donner. Mrs. Breen is of an insignificant family (her grandfather made his money in trade!) ...Read More

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Rich Horton Reviews Short Fiction

F&SF 11-12/17 Asimov’s 11-12/17 Analog 11-12/17 Lightspeed 12/17 Clarkesworld 11/17 Beneath Ceaseless Skies 11/21/17 Uncanny 9-10/17 Not One of Us 10/17 Omni Winter ’17

Global Dystopias, Junot Díaz, ed. (Boston Re­view) November 2017. Infinity Wars, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Solaris) October 2017. Acadie, Dave Hutchinson (Tor.com Publishing) September 2017.

F&SF’s November/December issue features “Stillborne“, a significant and, as always, enjoyable entry in Marc Laidlaw‘s Spar/Gorlen ...Read More

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Rich Horton Reviews Short Fiction: Asimov’s, Clarkesworld, Lightspeed, BCS, and Tor.com

Asimov’s 9-10/17 Clarkesworld 10/17 Lightspeed 11/17 Beneath Ceaseless Skies 9/28/17 Tor.com 10/17 Prime Meridian, Silvia Moreno-Garcia (Indiegogo/Innsmouth Free Press) December 2017. Singing My Sister Down, Margo Lanagan (Al­len and Unwin) May 2017.

Is the novelette the ideal form for SF? I sup­pose not necessarily, but it does work pretty well, as evidenced by the September-Octo­ber Asimov’s. R. Garcia y Robertson‘s “Grand Theft Spacecraft” is the ...Read More

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Rich Horton Reviews Short Fiction

F&SF 9-10/17 Analog 9-10/17 Beneath Ceaseless Skies 8/17/17 Lightspeed 10/17 Tor.com 9/6/17

The most exciting short fiction news this month is surely the appearance in the September/October F&SF of a new story by Samuel R. Delany. Even better, “The Hermit of Houston” is exceptional work! It’s set some time in a strange future and is hard to get a grip on (the best kind). From one angle ...Read More

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Rich Horton reviews Infinite Stars by Bryan Thomas Schmidt, ed.

Infinite Stars, Bryan Thomas Schmidt, ed. (Titan 9781785655937, $24.95, 688pp, hc) Oc­tober 2017.

Bryan Thomas Schmidt’s new anthol­ogy Infinite Stars is a big collection of space opera stories, split roughly evenly between reprints and originals. The reprints serve to some extent as an introduction to the subgenre, with examples from such classic series as Cordwainer Smith’s Instrumentality of Man­kind, Anne McCaffrey’s Ship Who Sang books, Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan ...Read More

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Rich Horton reviews Short Fiction

Lightspeed 8/17, 9/17 Tor.com 8/17 Apex 7/17 Interzone 7-8/17 McSweeney’s #49

There’s a good set of stories in the August Lightspeed. Ashok Banker‘s “Tongue” is an uncomfortable and rather over-the-top satire on the horrors of a traditional Indian mar­riage, set on an asteroid. The over-the-top elements are part and parcel of satire, though I also thought the portrayal of Indian culture seemed a wincing cliché, as did ...Read More

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Rich Horton reviews Short Fiction

Asimov’s 7-8/17 F&SF 7-8/17 Uncanny 7-8/17 Clarkesworld 7/17 Fantastic Stories of the Imagination, People of Color Take Over Special Issue Tor.com 7/17

There are two very entertaining novellas in the July-August Asimov’s, both by writers who have long been favorites of mine, and both of whom had long career hiatuses. Alexander Jablokov published nothing between 1998 and 2006; while R. Garcia y Robertson‘s story this month is the first ...Read More

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Rich Horton reviews Short Fiction: August 2017

Strange Horizons 6/5/17 Analog 7-8/17 Beneath Ceaseless Skies 5/25/17, 6/22/17 Clarkesworld 6/17 Lightspeed 7/17 Tobias Buckell’s Patreon 4/17 Tor.com 6/17 Tin House Summer ’17

Utopia, LOL?” is a very nice far-future story from a fairly new voice, Jamie Wahls, in Strange Horizons. It’s told by Kit, one of trillions of humans living in what appear to be Matrioshka brains in the extreme far future. Her job (one ...Read More

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Rich Horton reviews Short Fiction, January 2017

F&SF 11-12/16 Interzone 11-12/16 Analog 12/16 Tor.com 11/02/16, 11/16/16 The Starlit Wood, Dominik Parisien & Navah Wolfe, eds. (Saga Press) October 2016

F&SF for November/December features a rare and welcome appearance from Gardner Dozois, whose fame as an editor should not cause us to forget how good his fiction is. ‘‘The Place of Bones’’ is a short, stylish dark fantasy told by the tutor of a ...Read More

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Rich Horton reviews Short Fiction, September 2016

F&SF 7-8/16 Asimov’s 9/16 Clarkesworld 6/16, 7/16 Lightspeed 8/16 Beneath Ceaseless Skies 7/21/16 Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet 7/16 Swords v. Cthulhu, Jesse Bullington & Molly Tanzer, eds. (Stone Skin Press) August 2016.

Lavie Tidhar offers perhaps the best novella of the year in the July/August F&SF. ‘‘The Vanishing Kind’’ is set in London in the 1950s, but in an alternate London where the Nazis won WWII, and ...Read More

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Rich Horton reviews Short Fiction, May 2016

Analog 4/16 Asimov’s 3/16 F&SF 3-4/16 Lightspeed 4/16 Beneath Ceaseless Skies 3/3/16, 3/17/16 Galaxy’s Edge 3/16

Analog leads off April with a fine story by Maggie Clark, ‘‘Seven Ways of Looking at the Sun-Worshippers of Yul-Katan’’. It’s told by a woman native to the planet Yul-Katan, where the people worship the sun. Having lost her faith following her father’s ‘‘ascension’’ to the station orbiting their sun, she ...Read More

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RICH HORTON

RICH HORTON, Contributing Editor, is a software engineer living in Webster Groves, Missouri. He was born in Naperville, Illinois, and received a B.S. in Physics from the University of Illinois in 1981. He has been working for the same large aerospace concern in St. Louis for over 20 years. He has been reading science fiction since the Golden Age (i.e since he was 12). His reviews and essays have ...Read More

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Rich Horton reviews Sandra McDonald

Sandra McDonald is best known for novels which, on the face of them, are fairly conventional military SF with a romantic slant, yet those who have followed her short fiction know she’s a quirkier writer than her novels display. Diana Comet and Other Improbable Stories features 14 tales, many originals, set in a sort of alternate history that for the most part is a transparent version of our world, at ...Read More

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Issue 703 Table of Contents, August 2019

The August 2019 issue of Locus magazine has interviews with William Gibson and Lesley Nneka Arimah. Awards news includes the Campbell, Sturgeon, Clarke, Shirley Jackson, Chesley, and Prometheus awards winners. Other news includes an update on the Beagle legal battle, the retirement of DC’s Vertigo imprint, Amazon legal developments, the results of this year’s Locus Survey, and more. Kameron Hurley‘s column ...Read More

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Issue 702 Table of Contents, July 2019

The July 2019 issue of Locus has interviews with Ben H. Winters and R.F. Kuang. Awards news covers the 2019 Locus, Ditmar, and Lambda Literary winners, and finalists, longlists, and/or ballots from the Campbell Memorial, Chesley, Mythopoeic, Sunburst, Aurora, and Eugie awards. There are photos and reports covering the 2019 SFWA Nebula Conference, WisCon 43, and The Outer Dark Symposium ...Read More

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New & Notable Books, June 2019

Nathan Ballingrud, Wounds (Saga 4/19) This collection – “Six Stories from the Border of Hell” – gathers some of the author’s best dark work, including original story “The Butcher’s Tale” and “The Visible Filth” (2015), adapted as 2019 horror film Wounds. His first collection, North American Lake Monsters (2013), won a Shirley Jackson Award and was nominated for British Fantasy, Stoker, and World Fantasy Awards.

 

Ashok K. Banker, ...Read More

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Issue 701 Table of Contents, June 2019

The June 2019 issue of Locus has interviews with Michael Blumlein and Kaaron Warren. The issue lists US and UK forthcoming books titles through March 2020. Awards news covers the 2018 Nebula Awards, Stoker Awards, Asimov’s Readers’ Awards, Analog Anlab Awards, Aurealis Awards, and more. There are finalists and shortlists from the Clarke, Shirley Jackson, and Scribe Awards. Convention and event ...Read More

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New & Notable Books, May 2019

Elizabeth Bear, Ancestral Night (Saga 3/19) A thrill­ing space adventure from the Hugo Award-winning author, following salvagers Connla and Haimey Dz (and their cats) from the black hole at the center of the Milky Way to the galactic fringes as they encounter pirates, the corpse of a giant space-dwelling alien, and agents of the galaxy-spanning Synarche. The first in the new White Space series.

 

Zen Cho, The True Queen ...Read More

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New Books : 14 May 2019

Find your favorite animal in these new SFF books: dragons, trufflepigs, snake-haired gorgons, a trickster coyote, and a cyberpunk hero named Lion. New titles this week are by Sarah Beth Durst, Fernando Flores, W. Michael Gear, Paula Guran, Guy Gavriel Kay, Dean Koontz, Steven Kotler, Ambelina & Ezekial Kwaymullina, Una McCormack, Eliot Peper, Max Porter, Karen Russell, and Adrian Tchaikovsky. ...Read More Read more

Issue 700 Table of Contents, May 2019

The May 2019 issue of Locus has interviews with G. Willow Wilson and Ilana C. Myer. Grand Master Gene Wolfe (1931-2019) and Vonda N. McIntyre (1948-2019) are remembered with obituaries and appreciations. News includes the 2019 Hugo Awards ballot, 1944 Retro Hugos ballot, Audrey Shulman’s Philip K. Dick Award win, the new Tor horror imprint, Gabriela Damián Miravete’s Tiptree win, the closure of the Gemmell ...Read More

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Issue 699 Table of Contents, April 2019

The April issue features interviews with Jasper Fforde and Sarah Beth Durst; a column by Kameron Hurley; an obituary for Janet Asimov; the Sturgeon Award and Aurealis Awards finalists; the Audie Awards winners; the Kitschies shortlists; a photo story on Bastard Legion; FOGcon report; a spotlight on David Baldacci; SF in India; and reviews of short fiction and books by Cynthia Ward, Chen ...Read More

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Gary K. Wolfe Reviews How to Fracture a Fairy Tale by Jane Yolen

How to Fracture a Fairy Tale, Jane Yolen (Tachyon 978-1-61696-306-4, $16.95, 320pp, tp) November 2018.

Chances are that not every reader of Jane Yo­len’s collection How to Fracture a Fairy Tale – which follows close upon her World Fantasy Award winning The Emerald Circus – will remember the classic Rocky and Bullwinkle segments from nearly 60 years ago, narrated by Edward Everett Horton, which as far as I know ...Read More

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Issue 698 Table of Contents, March 2019

The March issue features interviews with Leigh Bardugo and S.A. Chakraborty; a column by Cory Doctorow; obituaries and appreciations for Betty Ballantine, Carol Emshwiller, and Carrie Richerson; the 2018 Nebula Awards Ballot, 2018 Stoker Awards Final Ballot, 2019 Carnegie and Greenaway Medal Longlists, the BSFA, Audie, and Spectrum 26 Awards Finalists; a photo story on Finch for the Stage ...Read More

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A Year of Looking Backward by Gary K. Wolfe

I’m not sure this is prog­ress: 2018 began with The Handmaid’s Tale, Nine­teen Eighty-Four, and Fahrenheit 451 back on the bestseller lists, and a fair number of folks re­marking on how prescient Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower suddenly seemed.

Toward the end of the year, just before Thanksgiv­ing, Vintage decided to re-release, for the first time in decades, Fletcher Knebel’s Night of Camp David, the 1965 ...Read More

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2019 Locus Poll and Survey

Here is the online version of the 49th annual Locus Awards ballot, covering works that appeared in 2018. Thank you for participating! In each category, you may vote for up to five works or nominees, ranking them 1 (first place) through 5 (fifth).

We have seeded the ballot with options based on our 2018 Recommended Reading List; this greatly facilitates tallying of results. As always, you are welcome to use the ...Read More

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2018 Locus Recommended Reading List

Welcome to the annual Locus Recommended Reading List!

Published in Locus magazine’s February 2019 issue, the list is a consensus by Locus editors, reviewers, and other professionals — editor-in-chief Liza Groen Trombi; reviews editor Jonathan Strahan; Locus reviewers Liz Bourke, Katharine Coldiron, Carolyn Cushman, Paul Di Filippo, Lila Garrott, Amy Goldschlager, Paula Guran, Rich Horton, John Langan, Russell Letson, Adrienne Martini, Ian Mond, Colleen Mondor, Tim Pratt, Arley Sorg, Tom ...Read More

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Issue 697 Table of Contents, February 2019

The February issue features an interview with Derek Künsken; our 2018 Year in Review with the 2018 Recommended Reading List and 2018 Book and Magazine summaries; a column by Kameron Hurley; the PKD Award Finalists; SFWA news; the Stoker Preliminary Ballot; photo stories on Christopher Rowe, Heinlein’s The Puppet Grand Master, and Rick Bowes‘ 75th birthday; obituaries for Fred Patten, Jane ...Read More

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New & Notable Books, January 2019

Ben Aaronovitch, Lies Sleeping (DAW 11/18) Detective Constable (and apprentice wizard) Peter Grant has to deal with some major new developments as he hunts the Faceless Man and ends up confronting an old (very old) foe in this thrilling seventh book in the Rivers of London urban fantasy series. (Published simultaneously in the UK by Gollancz.)

 

Aliette de Bodard, In the Vanishers’ Palace (JABberwocky Literary Agency 10/18) “Beauty and ...Read More

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