Table of Contents, June 1985

This is the scanned Table of Contents for the issue, embedded as a PDF. It is searchable and includes all of the titles reviewed in the month. These issues are not available digitally yet, but most can be ordered by contacting the Locus offices.

THE NEWSPAPER OF THE SCIENCE FICTION FIELD
ISSN-0047-4959
EDITOR & PUBLISHER
Charles N. Brown
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Faren Miller
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Donna Burriston
MANAGING EDITOR
Dawn Atkins
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Norman Spinrad
Richard Curtis
Fritz Leiber
Debbie Notkin
Locus, ISSN-0047-4959, The Newspaper of the
Science Fiction Field, is published monthly by LOCUS
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Contents copyright © 1985 by Locus Publications.
Second class postage paid at Oakland, California.
Postmaster: Send address changes to Locus Publications,
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Nebula Awards Winners…………….p.1
1985 Locus Awards…………………. 1
Shawna McCarthy Leaves Asimov’s…….1
Theodore Sturgeon Dies…………….. 1
Appreciations:
by Harlan Ellison……………… 1
by Paul Williams……………… 49
by Robert A. Heinlein………… 50
by Robert Silverberg…………. 50
Editorial…………………………. 3
Palmer Wins Crook Memorial Award……4
Constellation Bailout……………… 4
Superheroes to Hyperspace…………. 4
SF Movie Moneymakers………………. 4
Announcements……………………… 4
Booknotes…………………………. 4
Taxing Conventions………………… 5
SF Art Burglary…………………….5
Rena Wolner Resigns from Pocket…….5
More Publishing Changes…………….5
People & Publishing……………….. 7
Agent’s Corner, Richard Curtis…….. 9
AD
Ac e …………………………….. p. 18
Baen………………………………. 8
Bantam……………………22,23,52,53
Berkley……………………………37
Bluejay……………………….. 48,55
Classified Ad s …………………….44
L.W. Currey, Inc…………………. 36
DA W………………………………. 12
Del Rey………………………… 6,16
Fandom Directory…………………. 42
Galaxy Bookshop……………………33
WHEN YOU CARE, WHEN YOU LOVE
Marion Zimmer Bradley called me on
Monday night to tell me Ted Sturgeon
was dying; my mind and thoughts split
into two parts. The a n a l y t i c side
thought about the problems of rewriting
page 1 and finding room for an obituary;
the emotional side retreated 30
years to the time when Sturgeon was
affecting my life so much. I called
Paul Williams, who was closer to Ted in
these later years. He called the hospital
and confirmed it. I asked him to
write the obituary when needed. He
agreed. I called Robert Heinlein,
Betty Ballantine, Robert Silverberg,
and a few others I knew were close
friends of Ted’s. I asked Russ Galen
to tell his clients Carl Sagan and
Arthur C. Clarke. In some cases I
asked and in some cases people offered
to do short appreciations. (There will
be many more next issue.) I thought of
my own.
Robert Heinlein was my first boyhood
hero and distant mentor; Sturgeon, the
second, was just as important. I went
directly from the Heinlein juveniles to
MORE THAN HUMAN and the great Sturgeon
stories in the early G a l axy and in E.
PLURIBUS UNICORN etc. They helped
shape my teenage years.
I remember a speech Sturgeon gave at
a conference in Philadelphia. It was
called “Love”, and it was beautiful.
He defined love as “when someone else’s
happiness becomes essential to your
own.” It was a powerful speech and the
audience was stunned at the emotional
end. We had lunch or dinner afterwards
and I thanked him for many things. I
also asked what had happened to THE
UNBEGOTTEN MAN, a novel announced by
Greenberg: P u b l i s h e r s in 1950. He
smiled and said it wasn’t time yet. I
told him how much I liked THE DREAMING
JEWELS. He was constantly referring to
it as “the drooling jeans” and thought
it was awful. I was shocked. I was
very young. Eventu a l l y I grew up,
discovered he wasn’t 400 feet tall, and
we became friendly. “When You Care,
When You Love” appeared and I realized
it was part 1 of that long ago a n nounced
novel, THE UNBEGOTTEN MAN. I
asked about the rest of it and he
didn’t answer. I asked for a few
years, then stopped. It became obvious
the book wasn’t going to be written.
We met fairly frequently over the last
decade, but I didn’t ask him about his
writing. We talked of other things.
The emotional attachment seemed to have
faded, and Ted the guru was not as
interesting as Theodore Sturgeon the
writer. (He always insisted on T heodore
in print, Ted in private.)
Most of this issue of Locus was ready
for the printer. I decided to hold the
Nebula Banquet photographs for next
issue as well as a piece on Madeleine
L’Engle and some photo stories of book
signings. The center portion went to
the p r i n t e r and we redid the front
page. We prepared alternate issues
just in case and had alternate headings
made up.
On Wednesday night, Robert Heinlein
called to tell me Ted had just died. I
suddenly discovered I still cared, I
still loved, and I grieved.
NEW YORK, NEW YORK
I spent twelve days in New York for
the Nebula banquet and visiting publishers.
By the end, I was suffering
from information overload and my brains
were turning to mush. I hid out in my
hotel room for most of a day after the
banquet. I stayed with John Douglas
(Continued on page 51)
LOCUS June 1985/3
Moons & Stars & Stuff, Fritz Leiber..11
Locus Looks at Books, Faren Miller…13
Locus Looks at More Books, Debbie
Notkin………………………. 15
Locus Looks at More Books, Dan Chow..17
The Asimov Connection, Isaac Asimov..19
Locus Poll Results……………….. 24
Bests of the Year Contents……….. 27
Convention Updates……………….. 27
Lunacon Report, Jane J e w e l l ……. 28
Balticon Report, Jane Jewell……… 29
1985 Conference on the Fantastic,
Elizabeth Anne Hull…………. 30
Parcon 1985………………………. 32
International Books & Magazines……32
Kate & Damon in Brazil, Damon Knight.33
Books Received— April……………..35
Magazines Received— April………… 40
Classified A ds…………………….44
Bestseller Lists…………………. 47
Obituaries: T.L. Sherred,
Douglass Wallop, Jacques Perron.49
INDEX
Mayfair Games……………………..38
Micro Information Concepts……….. 38
Mid-American Tours……………….. 41
Phantasia Press………………….. 34
Questar………………………….. 14
Scream/Press………………………10
Signet…………………………… 20
Simon & Schuster…………………. 39
Southern Illinois
University Press………. 39
Tor………………………. 2,31,43,56
Contents
ISSUE #293 • VOL. 18, NO. 6 • JUNE 1985 Mailing date: May 22,1985