Theodora Goss: Monstrous Voices

Theodora Goss was born Teodóra Eszter Muszbek, September 30, 1968 in Budapest, Hungary. She left with her mother and brother at age five, and lived in Italy and Belgium before immigrating to the US when she was seven. They lived in New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland before settling in Virginia. She graduated from the University of Virginia in 1990 with an English degree, then attended Harvard Law School and worked ...Read More

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Jeffrey Ford: Leviathan

Jeffrey Ford was born November 8, 1955 in West Islip NY. He flunked out of community college and took various jobs until he earned enough to buy a clam boat at age 18. He worked as a clammer for several years while writing on the side, until he decided to go back to school. He returned to the same community college, then attended New York State University, Binghamton, where he ...Read More

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Kameron Hurley: On Patience, Goal-Setting, and Gardening

I’m coming off a 16-hour editing day working on a novel called The Light Brigade, which comes out next year. The editing flurry was my fault – the book was three months late. Any later, and it was going to have to push to another publishing season.

Pushing a book out is a pain to everyone involved: the publishing machine is a capitalist enterprise like any other, and a writer ...Read More

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Warren Hammond Guest Post–“Why I Took the Indie Route (This Time)”

I was between projects when Joshua Viola of Hex Publishers bought me a beer and pitched me his idea for a new science fiction franchise called Denver Moon. To this point in my career, I’d been fortunate enough to have four novels published by big-five publishers. I’d done many of the things aspiring writers dream about: book signings, media interviews, responding to fan mail. Nobody would confuse my career with ...Read More

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Fonda Lee Guest Post–“The Case for YA Science Fiction”

On a recent plane ride home from a major book festival, I ended up chatting with a woman next to me who had also been at the festival. “So, what do you write?” she asked, when she discovered I was an attending author. I reluctantly told her that I write science fiction and fantasy. “Oh, that explains why I didn’t see you on any panels this weekend,” she said. “I ...Read More

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Nick Harkaway: A Little Bit Quantum

NICK HARKAWAY is a pseudonym for Nicholas Cornwell, born November 26, 1972 in Cornwall England, son of author David Cornwell (better known by his pen name John le Carré) and editor Valérie Jane Eustace. He attended University College School in North London, and Clare College, Cambridge, where he studied philosophy and earned a degree in social and political science. An avid martial artist, he has studied Shorinji Kan Jiu Jitsu, ...Read More

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Cat Rambo Guest Post–“Whatever Works”

One of the things I insist to my students is that no writing advice is one-size-fits-all, aside from the general notion is that one should put words down in some form or another. Some people do what we affectionately call “pantsing” after the notion that one is writing by the seat of one’s pants, flying into the wordcloud and seeing what collects on one’s wings along the way. Others outline ...Read More

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SF in SF with Michael Moorcock

Jacob & Rina Weisman, Terry Bisson, Michael Moorcock. Photo by Arley Sorg

SF in SF hosted Michael Moorcock at the American Bookbinders Museum in San Francisco on April 9, 2018, coordinated by Rina Weisman and moderated by Terry Bisson. The event featured readings and signings, a Q&A session, a full bar, and time to mingle. Books were available for purchase thanks to Borderlands Books; Tachyon Publications sponsored the event. For ...Read More

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Nicholas Sansbury Smith Guest Post–“Paranoia or Pragmatism?”

Prior to my career as a writer, I worked for Iowa Homeland Security and Emergency Management in disaster mitigation. My job was to help communities prepare for natural and man-made events, some of them bordering on apocalyptic. I spent most of my time working with communities to prepare for these disasters, but I also spent time in the field observing and documenting the aftermath when disaster struck. Seeing how devastating ...Read More

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Ada Palmer: Beyond the Exponential Age

ADA LOUISE GRACE PALMER was born June 9, 1981 in Washington DC. She grew up in Annapolis MD and went to college two years early, at age 16. She attended Simon’s Rock College of Bard for two years, then transferred to Bryn Mawr College, where she studied Re­naissance history. She did her PhD at Harvard, spending time studying in Florence and Rome, partly funded as a Fulbright fellow. She graduated ...Read More

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Chinese SF New Year Gala

The third SF New Year Gala, a special online publication project organized by Future Affairs Administration (FAA), went viral over the Chinese New Year in February 2018. Twenty-one SF stories and artworks by distinctive SF writers and art­ists from China, Korea, and US were published daily on multiple major new-media publication platforms during February 5-25, receiving a total of 9.2 million views. A follow-up writer’s workshop took place in Beijing, ...Read More

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Cory Doctorow: The Engagement-Maximization Presidency

Photo by Paula Mariel Salischiker

Incentives matter.

The dominance of ad-supported businesses online created an odd and perverse incentive to “maximize engagement” – to go to enormous lengths to create tools that people used for as long as possible, even when this made the product worse. Think of how Google added a “trending searches” drop­down to the default search-bar on Android, so that any time you went looking for a ...Read More

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Rainforest Writers Village

The annual Rainforest Writers Village retreat, hosted by Patrick Swenson and Fairwood Press, was held at Lake Quinault WA in three sessions: Feb 21-25, Feb 28-March 4, and March 7-11, 2018. For more information, see the Rainforest Writers website.

Session One (l to r): back: Manny Frishberg, Patrick Swenson, James Van Pelt, Vickie Saunders, Louise Marley, Di Francis, John Pitts, Charles Walbridge, Lee Hallison, Devon Monk, Bob Brown, Julie McGalliard, ...Read More Read more

SF Crossing the Gulf — Season 3 Debut!

A Marvel movie, an afrofuturistic dream, a box office phenomenon… and more? We take a side step from page to screen to comment on the many ways that Black Panther works, and works well. We also hint at future podcasts to compare text to film in other adaptations such as A Wrinkle in Time, Annihilation, and Arrival (2016).

https://locusmag.com/sfcrossingthegulf/sfgulf19.mp3

Download mp3 file.

Note: This podcast and all previous SF Crossing ...Read More

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Spotlight on: Sarah Pinsker

Sarah Pinsker (2010s) by Karen Osborne

Sarah Pinsker’s first professional sale was “20 Ways the Desert Could Kill You” in 2012. She followed that with the Sturgeon Award-winning “In Joy, Knowing the Abyss Behind”, also her first Nebula Award-nominated story. She has since won the Nebula Award for novelette “Our Lady of the Open Road.” Her 40+ stories have appeared in Asimov’s, Strange Horizons, F&SF, Lightspeed, and Uncanny, among others, ...Read More

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Spotlight on: Michelle Sagara

Michelle Sagara (2014) by Glenne MacKay

Michelle Sagara was born in, and has spent all her life living in, what is now called Toronto. Her long-suffering husband and two children have learned that there’s nothing terribly mystical or magical about being a writer, although the experience of watching their mother has made imposter syn­drome and lack of critical objectivity about one’s work seem completely normal.

Reading is one of her ...Read More

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Galactic Philadelphia Reading Series

Malka Older and David Walton took part in the Galactic Philadelphia reading series with an appearance on February 13, 2018. Sally Wiener Grotta and Lawrence Schoen curate the series.

For more, see the Galactic Philadelphia site.

Sally Wiener Grotta, Malka Older, David Walton, Lawrence Schoen (by Tim Burke)

This and more like it in the April 2018 issue of Locus.

While you are here, please take a moment to support ...Read More

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Tananarive Due: Sense of Mission

Tananarive Priscilla Due was born January 5, 1966 in Tallahassee FL, daughter of civil rights lawyer John D. Due, Jr. and leading civil rights activist Patricia Stephens Due. She grew up in Miami, and attended Northwestern Univer­sity’s Medill School of Journalism before getting her MA in English from Leeds University, where she studied Nigerian literature. She worked as a journalist for the Miami Herald after college, wrote full-time for 15 ...Read More

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Jeff VanderMeer: Blur the Lines

Jeffrey Scott VanderMeer was born July 7, 1968 in Belfont PA, and grew up in the Fiji Islands (where his parents worked for the Peace Corps), Ithaca NY, and Gainesville FL, where he attended the University of Florida for three years. He went to Clarion in 1992.

VanderMeer’s first story of genre interest was “Night Prayers”, ap­pearing when he was in high school in 1986; early work also appeared in ...Read More

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Speculative Fiction in Translation: Novels, Collections, and Short Stories 2017

This list of 2017 speculative titles in translation was compiled by Rachel Cordasco, who founded and runs site sfintranslation.com. Corrections may be sent to locus@locusmag.com.

NOVELS

  • Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin, translated from the Spanish by Megan McDowell (Riverhead Books, January 10) [Argentina]
  • The Mountains of Parnassus by Czeslaw Milosz, translated from the Polish by Stanley Bill (Yale University Press, January 10) [Poland]
  • The Book of the Dead by Orikuchi
...Read More
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Kameron Hurley: Writing is Hard, and That’s OK

On winning the Oscar Award for best original screenplay, Jordan Peele admitted that he started his winning script for the film Get Out at least 20 times. Why 20? Because he just didn’t feel he could get the script to work, no matter how many times he tackled it.

Author N.K. Jemisin relates a similar struggle in the writing of her masterful novel, The Fifth Season. In her acceptance speech ...Read More

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African SFF 2017 by Geoff Ryman

2017 was a year of small watersheds and consolida­tions, rather than break­throughs for African specu­lative fiction.

Roughly 40 short specu­lative fiction stories were published in magazines and anthologies, according to Wole Talabi’s database on the African Speculative Fiction Society website.

In some ways it was a year of sales to international markets. Wole Talabi, Cat Hellesin, and Dare Segun Falowo had important stories published in F&SF. Jordan Ifueko wrote “Os­hun ...Read More

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2017 in Listening by Amy Goldschlager

Here are a few loosely connected thoughts about the previous year in audio, and what we might expect in 2018.

Old Favorites

This past year, new audio productions allowed us to revisit freshly relevant classic works of science fiction. George Guidall, himself a classic voice in audiobook publishing, lent his gravitas to Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Lathe of Heaven, which raises issues about the devastation of climate change and ...Read More

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SF Short Fiction, 2017 by Rich Horton

How to view the state of the field now? SF (and fantasy) are in some sort of pop culture ascendance – the rapturous reception of The Last Jedi on the one hand, and Wonder Woman on another hand, and even The Shape of Water (a more ambitious film than the more popular pair I mentioned, and yet also an hommage of sorts to 1950s monster movies) is surely evidence of ...Read More

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Spotlight on: Tricia Reeks of Meerkat Publishing

Tricia Reeks lives in the bear-infested mountains of Asheville, North Carolina with her mountaineer husband and her two ferocious French bulldogs. She is the founder of Meerkat Press, the co-editor of Behind the Mask: An Anthology of Heroic Proportions (a Kirkus Reviews Best Indie Book of 2017) and Love Hurts: A Speculative Fiction Anthology.

Tell us about how your press was founded. Why did you decide to get into publishing? ...Read More

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2017 Year-in-Review by Gardner Dozois

Last year I mentioned that most of the stories I was seeing were of short-story length, with few long novelettes or no­vellas. Although perhaps most of this year’s stories were still of short-story length, this year saw a dramatic resur­gence of novellas. By one count, there were over 80 novellas published in the SF/fantasy/horror genres in 2017. Most of these were published as standalone chapbooks, and the ambitious new pro­gram ...Read More

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Dark Fiction in 2017 by Ellen Datlow

2017 has been a good year for dark fiction. Here’s a mere taste of the good stuff:

Some novels I enjoyed: Kit Reed’s Mormama is a marvelous southern gothic about a cursed ancestral home with three elderly sisters living within. When a divorced relative and her young son move in and an accident victim with no memory hides out in the basement, the haunts become active, whispering ugly secrets. Alas, ...Read More

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When It Was 2017, It Was a Very Good Year, by Graham Sleight

I’ve been writing these year-end summations for over a decade now, and I find it hard to think of a year when there’s been more really good science fiction and fantasy to record. (Of course, I’ve also read a few duds – omitted below – but then that’s always the case.) I’m not sure why 2017 has seen so many strong books. There aren’t many unifying themes across the works ...Read More

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On the Border by Paul Kincaid

More and more, as I look back each year on what has caught my eye, I find myself drawn to works of genre uncertainty, work that plays with what had been safely familiar tropes, and results in fiction where we cannot convincingly say: that is science fiction, or that is fantasy, or that is mainstream. It is here, it seems to me, here in these borderlands, these debatable lands, that ...Read More

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Angela Slatter: Between the Worlds

Angela Gaye Slatter was born May 16, 1967 in Cairns Australia, and grew up mostly there and in Brisbane and Ipswich. She studied French and history at the University of Queensland, later earned a master’s, and received a PhD in creative writing in 2012. She attended Clarion South in 2009, Tin House in 2006 and has taught writing at vari­ous writers’ centres, universities and festivals.

Slatter’s short fiction is highly ...Read More

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Discomfort Reading by Tim Pratt

I didn’t read much new SF and fantasy this year. I spent a lot of time being anxious for reasons outside the scope of this essay (cough politics cough), and in times like that, I tend to revisit old beloved books, so I spent some time returning to works by Connie Willis, and Terry Pratchett, and Joe Abercrombie (I know, Lord Grimdark might seem an odd choice for comfort reading, ...Read More

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