Table of Contents, July 1986

This is the scanned Table of Contents for the issue, embedded as a PDF. It is searchable and includes all of the titles reviewed in the month. These issues are not available digitally yet, but most can be ordered by contacting the Locus offices.

ISSN-0047-4959
EDITOR & PUBLISHER
Charles N. Brown
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Faren Miller
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
Carolyn F. Cushman
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Richard Curtis
Fritz Leiber
Debbie Notkin
Dan Chow
Locus. ISSN-0047-4959, The Newspaper of the
Science Fiction Field, is published monthly by LOCUS
PUBLICATIONS. Editorial address: 34 Ridgewood
Lane, Oakland, CA 94611; telephone (415) 339-9196.
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Contents copyright c 1986 by Locus Publications.
Second class postage paid at Oakland, California.
Postmaster: Send address changes to Locus Publications,
P.O. Box 13305, Oakland, CA 94661.
Clive Barkers Banking on Blood….. p.1
Tappan King New Twilight Zone Editor..1
Low Key New Orleans AB A …………….1
Editorial Matters…………………. 5
Ellison Wins Milford Award………… 6
STAR TREK Stamp Campaign………….. 6
Waldenbooks Unchained………………6
News From Italy…………………… 6
The Data File………………………6
Book Notes………………………… 7
1986 TAFF Winner………………….. 7
1986 Ditmar Awards………………… 7
Writers of the Future Workshop……..7
Conspiracy Update…………………. 7
People & Publishing……………….. 9
Agent’s Corner, Richard Curtis…….11
Moons & Stars & Stuff, Fritz Leiber..13
Locus Looks at Books, Faren Miller…15
Locus Looks at More Books,
Debbie Notkin………………….. 17
Locus Looks at More Books, Dan Chow..19
Small Wonders: Short Fiction Reviews,
Amy Thomson……………………. 19
L o c u s Survey Results………………22
Nebula Weekend…………………… 24
Convention Listings……………….26
Science Fiction in Japan…………. 30
SF Around the World……………….31
News From the Soviet Union,
Boris Zavgorodny……………. 31
International Books & Magazines….. 32
Brian Aldiss: Time for Another Spree.33
British Books: May-June………….. 37
Magazines Received— May………….. 39
Books Received— May……………….40
Classified Ads…………………… 49
Obituaries: Chesley Bonestell,
Jorge Luis Borges, Dave Fox,
J. Harold Bushman…………… 52
Bestseller Lists…………………. 54
Locus Letters……………………. 57
ISSUE #306 • VOL 19, NO. 7 • JULY 1986 Mailing date: June 23,1986
A c e ……………………………….. 8
Avon………………………………14
Baen……………………….. 27,28,29
Bantam Spectra………………45,48,51
Berkley………………………….. 43
Blue jay……………………….. 53,55
Classified Ads…………………… 49
Lloyd Currey………………………42
D A W ……………………………….. 4
Del Rey………………………..41,59
Locus……………………………. 58
Mayfair Games……………………. 32
Phantasia………………………… 12
Tor………………. 2,3,10,20,21,36,60
Warner/Questar…………………… 16
Warp/Father Tree…………………. 18
Worlds of I F ………………………38
As usual, the ABA was enjoyable and
exhausting. I spent most of my time
meeting with publishers, editors, and
bookstore people, while Carolyn went up
and down the aisles collecting catalogues
and freebies while trying to
sell ads to publicity people. The
convention is getting more and more
like the Frankfurt Book Fair. I was
able to talk to various French, German,
and English publishers without having
to go all the way to Europe. ABA has
certainly become the spring rights fair
and may even supplant Frankfurt as far
as rights in English-language books go.
CHESLEY BONESTELL
I never met Chesley Bonestell, and
it’s hard to feel anything but awe for
somebody dying at 98 while still a lert
and working, but writing Bonestell’s
obituary did affect me in another way.
Bonestell, Heinlein, Clarke, and others
in and out of the sf field were in the
right place at the right time and able
to i n f l u e n c e the right generation.
They were proselytizing space travel
not as a far-future fantasy, but as a
reachable goal during the lifetime of
their readers. Bonestell’s paintings,
Heinlein’s juveniles, their wonderful
collaboration on DESTINATION MOON, and
Clarke’s early novels PRELUDE TO SPACE
and THE SANDS OF MARS all said “these
things are possible and you can do
them.” They affected me and are responsible
for my choice of Physics and
Engineering in college. They sent many
others into what would eventually be
the mode r n space program. I don’t
think the present technological level
in space would have existed without
them. The number of scientists and
engineers I went to school with or have
met, who have fond memories of the sf
they read in the late forties and early
fifties, is astounding.
The forgotten man involved in this
was Wi l l y Ley. He wrote not only THE
CONQUEST OF SPACE but the best popular
science text on astronautics — ROCKETS,
MISSILES, AND SPACE TRAVEL. Writing
the B o n e s t e l l o b ituary got me
thinking about “Uncle Willy” again, as
he was affectionately known around sf
conventions. He died a few short weeks
before the first moon landing and is
now m o s t l y forgotten. Not quite,
though. He has a small crater on the
moon named after him, and I have no
doubt Heinlein, Bonestell, and Clarke
will be similarly honored one day. How
about the first three cities on the
moon? Bradbury, of course, belongs on
Mars.
NEW EMPLOYEE, BUT HELP STILL WANTED
We have a new employee working with
us as editorial trainee. She is Pamela
Troy, 27, and she moved here recently
from Pittsburgh PA. She has an MFA in
creative writing from the University of
North Carolina, and grew up in New
Orleans. Welcome aboard!
We’re still looking for another e n try-
level employee who wants to work in
publishing. Pay is $5.00 per hour plus
benefits. You must be able to drive,
type, and operate a computer. Call or
write us.
MAILING PROBLEMS
We’ve been getting an in c r e d i b l e
number of complaints about sea mail
subscriptions going astray. A few have
been our fault — addresses garbled or
entered wrong in the computer. We’ve
corrected these and sent off replacements
via air mail. Most are post
office problems which we can’t fix.
The addresses are right, we’re mailing
them every month, but nothing shows up
on the other end and nothing is returned.
Australia is particularly bad.
We’ve also been caught in some European
postal strikes. The Italian post office
is awful, etc. On the whole, mail
delivery is worse now (even here in the
U.S. with supposedly the best system)
than it has ever been. We ‘ ll keep
trying to i m p rove things, we don’t
ignore letters of complaint, we send
out replacement issues when we can, but
there is not much more we can do.
One p r o b l e m of ours. We’ve been
short-handed and book orders have not
been filled since late April. We’re
also way behind on correspondence, etc.
(Continued on page 56)
LOCUS July 1986 / 5